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  UPLOADING MATERIAL TO TCM’S DATABASE:
  1. WHAT KIND OF CONTENT MAY I CONTRIBUTE AND WHAT CONTENT DO YOU PREFER?
  2. You can add nearly any file: images, audio (such as commentaries), and video. Just follow the links to upload pages where you’ll find a “browse” button and directions to locate the file on your computer to submit. Some files you submit may have size limitations, so please try to optimize your files for web display: images should be 72dpi, compressed as either a GIF or JPG. We prefer video and audio to be compressed as well, such as Mp3 for audio, or Windows Media/Quicktime or MPEG for video.

    We also highly encourage the submission of textual information - personal reviews and comments on films, accurate information on film entries which are lacking data on such aspects as trivia, movie quotes, awards, biographical information on actors, directors and other industry personnel.

  3. DO I GET RECOGNITION FOR THE CONTRIBUTION?
  4. You always get recognized for any contribution to the database.

  5. CAN I WRITE A DESCRIPTION OF THE MATERIAL?
  6. Yes, you can write up to 400 words for any collection or item you submit. Please try to include some information on the material, as this will help our editors.

  DBASE FAQ:
  1. WHAT IS THE PURPOSE OF THE MOVIE DATABASE?
  2. The purpose of TCMdb.com is to provide the most comprehensive film information experience for movie lovers and those who want to learn more about a favorite classic film star or title. The database additionally allows fans to participate in adding their own comments, material, and knowledge about specific movies and film personnel. Our goal is to provide interesting and thorough classic film information for all titles and people in the database, and we need your help to make it better.

  3. WHAT ARE THESE THINGS CALLED “TCM ARCHIVES”?
  4. The TCM Archives are an area of the database where rare and collectible material from specific films and movie personnel can be viewed in an annotated display similar to a photo gallery. For example, if you enter the title "Casablanca" in the search field, it will display the film entry and you will see a link to the “Archives” section, which contains video clips from the movie, the original trailer, a production photo section that includes rarely seen stills from the set, production materials that include inter-office memos from the studio, public relations correspondence, sheet music, call sheets and other production documents, and a publicity section that includes movie posters and publicity stills. TCM Archives are interactive exploratory windows into the making of many of the great classic films that TCM celebrates.

  5. WHERE DO THE ARCHIVE MATERIALS COME FROM?
  6. TCM Archives come from various sources and includes material from Warner Bros., MGM and RKO studios, assets from the TEC (Turner Entertainment Company) film library, private institutions and universities, internal contributions from staff members and purchases from private collectors. As the archives project continues to grow, we hope to see more user generated and donated materials from personal and private collections.

  7. WHERE DOES ALL OF THE MOVIE DATA AND INFORMATION COME FROM?
  8. The information that appears on TCMdb.com comes from several sources. It includes licensed material from the American Film Institute Catalogues (AFI), Baseline, Turner Entertainment's internal movie database, selected information from IMDB, TCM produced content (articles and home video reviews, media and archival material), and user generated content (user reviews and contributions).

  9. HOW CURRENT IS THE TCM MOVIE DATABASE?
  10. The TCM Movie Database is as current and up to date on recent film releases and movie personnel as many other online databases. However, our focus is on pre-1990 titles, particularly the studio era years from the late twenties to the early 1970s. While we have information on virtually all current and recent titles, TCM’s focus remains on classic film. Our goal continues to be to make these films and the people who made them the most richly informative records for fans of classic cinema.

  11. WHAT IS DONE WITH THE INFORMATION COLLECTED FROM THE "NOT ON HOME VIDEO" VOTES?
  12. Tcm.com collects the votes on films not yet released on any home entertainment formats and tallies them in order of popularity. The most requested titles are identified by their studios. We then contact their home entertainment divisions and provide them with the results of our voting. This helps them in prioritizing which films in their library they have not yet released for the home video market. As a result of our efforts several top ranked titles from our viewers' votes have been released on DVD and VHS such as "Marie Antoinette" (1938) and "The Heiress" (1949).